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dc.contributor.advisor Dittrich, Christoph Prof. Dr.
dc.contributor.author Beckert, Barbara
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-02T09:13:33Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-02T09:13:33Z
dc.date.issued 2017-03-02
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-1735-0000-0023-3DBD-F
dc.language.iso eng de
dc.relation.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subject.ddc 910 de
dc.subject.ddc 550 de
dc.title A post-frontier in transformation: land relations between access, exclusion and resistance in Jambi province, Indonesia de
dc.type doctoralThesis de
dc.contributor.referee Dittrich, Christoph Prof. Dr.
dc.date.examination 2017-02-02
dc.description.abstracteng Since the early twentieth century, forests on the Indonesian island of Sumatra are converted into large plantation areas for the cultivation of boom crops, such as rubber and oil palms. This land use transformation goes along with land conflicts. Local actors are often deprived of access to land by new actors entering the scene, searching for land access. However, land conflicts do not only occur in the context of deforestation, at the edges of rainforests, in so-called frontier areas. They also occur in areas that have been converted from forests to agricultural land decades ago, so-called post-frontiers. Jambi province, located in the center of the island of Sumatra, stands as an example for such a highly dynamic post-frontier. Access to land is constantly negotiated between different powerful actors on different scales, leading to exclusion and resistance. In this dissertation, conflictive land relations in the post-frontier are analyzed and explained based on three research questions: (1) How did Jambi province transform into a dynamic post-frontier? (2) Which processes lead to conflictive land relations between access and exclusion in the post-frontier? (3) How does resistance against adverse land relations influence the post-frontier? In order to tackle these questions, a novel conceptual framework on conflictive land relations in the post-frontier is developed, which builds on political ecology and post-frontier research, on the theory of access and powers of exclusion framework and the terrains of resistance approach. Empirical qualitative research was conducted in seven research villages in two research areas in Jambi province, located in vicinity to the Bukit Duabelas National Park and the Harapan Rainforest conservation concession of PT REKI. Research revealed that since the Dutch colonial era plural legal orders exist in Indonesia, which means, that codified state laws and customary laws exist in parallel. Land has been allocated to concession areas in an uncontrolled manner in the past decades and today there is an overlapping mosaic of resource governance and territorial control in Jambi province, which characterizes the post-frontier. Different kinds of actors are struggling for access to land, and conflictive land relations between access, exclusion and resistance are fostered by plural legal orders and the non-recognition of customary land. However, reclaiming customary land has become a powerful tool for indigenous resistance, especially when local actors are supported by national and international NGOs. It is argued that the post-frontier will be further transformed in the next couple of years by indigenous land claims and resistance. de
dc.contributor.coReferee Faust, Heiko Prof. Dr.
dc.subject.eng land use transformation de
dc.subject.eng land conflicts de
dc.subject.eng post-frontier de
dc.subject.eng theory of access de
dc.subject.eng powers of exclusion de
dc.subject.eng terrains of resistance de
dc.subject.eng qualitative research de
dc.subject.eng Indonesia de
dc.subject.eng Jambi de
dc.identifier.urn urn:nbn:de:gbv:7-11858/00-1735-0000-0023-3DBD-F-5
dc.affiliation.institute Fakultät für Geowissenschaften und Geographie de
dc.subject.gokfull Geographie (PPN621264008) de
dc.identifier.ppn 881318965

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