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dc.contributor.advisor Kappas, Martin Prof. Dr.
dc.contributor.author Li, Yi
dc.date.accessioned 2016-02-10T09:47:35Z
dc.date.available 2016-02-10T09:47:35Z
dc.date.issued 2016-02-10
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-1735-0000-0028-86BB-7
dc.language.iso eng de
dc.relation.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subject.ddc 910 de
dc.subject.ddc 550 de
dc.title Integrated approaches of social-ecological resilience assessment and urban resilience management de
dc.title.alternative Resilience thinking, transformations and implications for sustainable city development in Lianyungang, China de
dc.type cumulativeThesis de
dc.contributor.referee Kappas, Martin Prof. Dr.
dc.date.examination 2016-02-03
dc.description.abstracteng The urban system is a multi-interaction system, due to the rapid urbanization and intertwined vulnerability of the ecological system. It will be a challenge to maintain a sustainable development of the urban and urbanizing areas (peri-urban areas). Resilience provides an approach for understanding how urban social-ecological systems adapt to disturbances like water or air pollution. To cope with these disturbances, a resilience-based management can operationalize and promote guiding principles for city development. The purpose of this thesis is to combine different quantitative approaches to calculate and assess resilience in the city of Lianyungang. This research calculates resilience with the social and ecological indicators based on two different theories: catastrophe models and adaptive capacity. Based on the output of these two theories, transformation processes are then illustrated by using early warning and adaptive cycle models. Specifically, resilience transitions between different landscape patterns and water quality variables are illustrated and their trajectories in relation to urban development strategies are detected. The results suggest a positive resilience trend and an adaptive development in Lianyungang during 2000-2010. However, the early warning model suggests a tipping point in 2009, where its signal hits a critical mark, which would imply a “Less Resistant” state. Furthermore, it reveals the decoupling of urban development and water quality. NH3-N, Cadmium and Total Phosphorus experienced the most resilient shifts under rapid urbanization, which points out a direction for future water quality management. National and regional planning practices contribute to manage the ongoing shifts in different resilient transition states. This implication can help to develop and enhance further city plans. Ultimately, this thesis provides the political underpinnings for building and managing resilient urban system in a particular coastal urban setting. de
dc.contributor.coReferee Faust, Heiko Prof. Dr.
dc.contributor.thirdReferee Dittrich, Christoph Prof. Dr.
dc.contributor.thirdReferee Sauer, Daniela Prof. Dr.
dc.contributor.thirdReferee Bürger-Arndt, Renate Prof. Dr.
dc.contributor.thirdReferee Ruppert, Hans Prof. Dr.
dc.subject.eng catastrophe model de
dc.subject.eng early warning de
dc.subject.eng tipping point / threshold de
dc.subject.eng adaptive capacity de
dc.subject.eng urban resilience de
dc.subject.eng social-ecological resilience de
dc.subject.eng water quality de
dc.identifier.urn urn:nbn:de:gbv:7-11858/00-1735-0000-0028-86BB-7-6
dc.affiliation.institute Fakultät für Geowissenschaften und Geographie de
dc.subject.gokfull Geographie (PPN621264008) de
dc.identifier.ppn 847412377

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