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dc.contributor.advisor Cohrs, Stefan PD Dr.
dc.contributor.author Lange, Anna Karoline
dc.date.accessioned 2016-03-01T11:03:31Z
dc.date.available 2016-03-01T11:03:31Z
dc.date.issued 2016-03-01
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/11858/00-1735-0000-0028-86E4-9
dc.language.iso eng de
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/
dc.subject.ddc 610 de
dc.title Electronic Media Use and Sleep Disturbance in German Adolescents Aged 11 to 17 Years: A Focus on Insomnia de
dc.type doctoralThesis de
dc.contributor.referee Cohrs, Stefan PD Dr.
dc.date.examination 2016-02-22
dc.description.abstracteng ABSTRACT Objective: Electronic media play an important role in the everyday lives of children and adolescents and have been shown to be associated with sleep problems. The objective of this study was to assess the associations between electronic media use and insomnia complaints (IC) in German adolescents with respect to gender differences in media use patterns and sleep problems. Design: Cross-sectional data from the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Children and Adolescents (KiGGS) was obtained from 2003 – 2006 for a total of 7533 adolescents aged 11 – 17. Methods: The assessment of IC and time spent using each type of electronic media (television, computer/internet, video games, total screen time, mobile phones and music) was included in a self-report questionnaire. Binary logistic regression analyses were performed to assess associations between time spent per day with each media device and IC. Age, SES, anxiety/depression and medical condition werde considered as confounders in the adjusted model. Males and females were considered separately. Results: Males: Computer/internet use of ≥3h/d (AOR=2.56 , p<0.05) and total screen time of ≥8h/d (AOR=2.45, p<0.01) were associated with IC in users. Females: Listening to music for ≥3h/d was associated with increased odds for IC (AOR=4.24, p<0.05) compared to non-listeners. Conclusion: Everyday use of electronic media is variously associated with insomnia complaints in adolescents. Clinicians dealing with youths referred for sleeping problems should be aware of gender specific patterns of media use and sleep problems. de
dc.contributor.coReferee Rothenberger, Aribert Prof. Dr.
dc.contributor.thirdReferee Reich, Günter Prof. Dr. Dr.
dc.subject.eng Insomnia de
dc.subject.eng Sleep de
dc.subject.eng Adolescents de
dc.subject.eng Electronic Media de
dc.subject.eng Media Use de
dc.subject.eng Sleep Problems de
dc.identifier.urn urn:nbn:de:gbv:7-11858/00-1735-0000-0028-86E4-9-5
dc.affiliation.institute Medizinische Fakultät de
dc.subject.gokfull Psychiatrie (PPN619876344) de
dc.identifier.ppn 848700341

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